Professor in Political Science and Computer and Information Science

David Lazer

Computational Social Science

Big Data: big insights into human behavior

One of the emerging memes of recent years has been around “big data”—the development of very large data sets around many domains. In the area of human behavior, there are these vast reservoirs of information about our lives that have accumulated, in everywhere from our inboxes to cellular phone companies to credit card companies, to the Internet, where a large fraction of all human expression is now taking place for all to see.

These data must surely offer awesome insights into both individual and human behavior, and our perspective on both will change as a result.

Computational Social Science: Publications List

Publications list

N. Cao, Y. Lin, X. Sun, D. Lazer, S. Liu and H. Qu, “Whisper: Tracing the Spatiotemporal Process of Information Diffusion in Real Time,” IEEE Information Visualization 2012, (also forthcoming in IEEETransactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics).

Y. Lin, J. Bagrow, and D. Lazer, “More Voices than Ever? Quantifying Media Bias in Networks,” ICWSM-11, Barcelona, 2011.

A Madan, S. Moturu, D. Lazer, and A Pentland “Social Sensing: Obesity, unhealthy Eating and Exercise in Face-to-face Networks”, proceedings of ACM Wireless Health 2010, San Diego, 2010.

A Madan, M. Cebrian, D. Lazer, and A. Pentland “Social Sensing to Model Epidemiological Behavior Change”, Proceedings of ACM Ubicomp 2010, Copenhagen (Nominated for Best Paper), 2010.

N. Eagle, A. Pentland, and D. Lazer, “Inferring friendship structure using mobile phone data,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, August 17, 2009.

D. Lazer, I. Mergel, and A. Friedman, “Co-citation of prominent social network articles in sociology journals: The evolving canon,” Connections, April, 2009.

D. Lazer, A. Pentland, L. Adamic, S. Aral, A-L Barabasi, D. Brewer, N. Christakis, N. Contractor, J. Fowler, M. Gutmann, T. Jebara, G. King, M. Macy, D. Roy, and M. Van Alstyne “Computational Social Science,” Science, February 6, 2009. 

J.-P. Onnela, J. Saramäki, J. Hyvönen, G. Szabó, D. Lazer, K. Kaskil, J. Kertész, and A.-L. Barabási,  “Structure and tie strengths in mobile communication networks,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, May 1, 2007.

Media Coverage And Appearance
Publication date: 
08/2016

Donald Trump has become well known for his shoot-from-the-hip tweeting style. Lots of insults, lots of rants and lots of energy. Data scientists who have examined all of Trump's tweets over time found he has some very clear Twitter strategies and tactics that, in many ways, have been working.

Keywords: 
Trump
Twitter
Journal Article
Publication date: 
08/2012
Authors: 
Allan Friedman
David Lazer

Whether as team members brainstorming or cultures experimenting with new technologies, problem solvers communicate and share ideas. This paper examines how the structure of communication networks among actors can affect system-level performance. We present an agent-based computer simulation model of information sharing in which the less successful emulate the more successful.

Keywords: 
network structure
exploration
exploitation
computational social science
Journal Article
Publication date: 
08/2012
Authors: 
David Lazer
Alex `Sandy' Pentland
Lada Adamic
Sinan Aral
Albert-Laszlo Barabasi
Devon Brewer
Nicholas A. Christakis
Noshir Contractor
James Fowler
Myron Gutmann
Tony Jebara
Gary King
Michael Macy
Deb Roy
Marshall Van Alstyne

We live life in the network. We check our e-mails regularly, make mobile phone calls from almost any location, swipe transit cards to use public transportation, and make purchases with credit cards. Our movements in public places may be captured by video cameras, and our medical records stored as digital files. We may post blog entries accessible to anyone, or maintain friendships through online social networks.

Keywords: 
computational social science
social science
Journal Article
Publication date: 
11/2011
Authors: 
Yu-Ru Lin
James P. Bagrow
David Lazer

Social media, such as blogs, are often seen as democratic entities that allow more voices to be heard than the conventional mass or elite media. Some also feel that social media exhibits a balancing force against the arguably slanted elite media. A systematic comparison between social and mainstream media is necessary but challenging due to the scale and dynamic nature of modern communication.